How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux?

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How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux
How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux

This is tutorial about How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux. Nowadays, the size of the USB Drive come in 32 GB up to 1 TB. I have a USB Drive with 1 TB capacity. Now of course, we don’t gonna use all the space of such a large USB just for one partition. We always wanted to create partitions for such USB drive so that we can manage our content better. So here in this tutorial I’m gonna use you the exact simple and correct way to create multiple partitions for your USB Drive without damaging the USB Drive.

Prerequisites

Make sure “GParted“, a tool for Linux, is installed in your Linux operating system. I am using Kali Linux 2019.4. GParted comes pre-installed in this version of Kali Linux. However, still if GParted isn’t installed in your Linux OS then all you have to do is just open up Terminal and enter below command to install GParted tool.

sudo apt-get install gparted

Alternatively you can use below command to install and upgrade GParted at same time.

sudo apt-get update; sudo apt-get install gparted

How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux?

1. Open up GParted tool from applications list. Or, enter below command in Terminal.

sudo gparted

2. Select your USB Drive from drop down located at top-right side.

How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux?
How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux?

3. Right Click on your USB Drive and click Delete.

How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux?
How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux?

4. Now again right click on Unallocated and select New.

How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux?
How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux?

5. The partition creator box will pop up now.

6. Enter the size in MB in New Size (MiB) area. Give a Partition Name and Label Name.

How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux?
How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux?

7. In the end, Press “+ Add“.

8. Again right-click on Unallocated and follow the same steps.

9. Once Done, click on Apply.

How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux?
How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux?

10. It will show you a warning. Press Apply again.

11. It will take few seconds and boom its all done.

12. Click on Close and then close the GParted tool as well.

How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux?How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux?How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux?How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux?How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux?
How to Make Partitions for USB Drive in Linux?

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